The Mind Illuminated archive

TCMC 14 Jan 2010 part 2


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Culadasa: [00:00:00] It was wonderful. Seeing everybody socializing and having such a good time there on that. Greg and I almost not quiet, but I almost felt bad breaking it up.

I hope everyone's saying really well this evening. And I'm wondering wondering if anybody has any questions or thoughts, maybe some thoughts coming out of what we talked about last week or anything else that, to start off our discussion. We'll see. Yeah. So we were talking about the eighth and breaking your heart last week, right?

Yeah. Up on the side of the bank.

So

Student: if you wait, there's

Culadasa: this ideal of

Student: dispassionate we're supposed to, it's a pain, but I saw

Culadasa: I was questioning relationships where.

Student: The session seems ideal to have pattern.

Culadasa: Yeah. Okay. If yes that's what I was going to do. If I probably can try to repeat that there is, I was talking about the emotional aspect, how

Student: they being human

Culadasa: and they, the Pasos that we experienced and some positive aspects of have. And what I hear you bringing up is that there is this impression that and and spiritual practice like realism that and you used the word supposed to it, which I thought was very Significant does it see how we're supposed to develop a dispassionate?

Student: And

Culadasa: on the other hand, there is a sense that we have that passion also can be a good thing, too. And in terms of, our human and social values that our assesses in which we put a positive value on passion. So I, I think that's what you're asking about. And that's a very good thing to talk about.

Student: It is true that

Culadasa: the goal of this path is to free ourselves from,

From passions, from certain kinds of passions. See, there's different ways that we can use the word. And we do have to be clear on what we mean by passion and which passions that we're referring to. But but definitely the words that are used are dispatched to become dispassionate and to overcome our attachments will, of course we associate love and things like that as being an attachment.

And so w we're what really are we talking about? Where are we trying to go here? And let's be careful about how we use the words and also about ideas as opposed to, because also a part of the path isn't that we are supposed to somehow abolish from ourselves, certain kinds of emotions and feelings, but there are certain kinds of emotions that.

Certainly the practice. We will overcome them. They will they will disappear and there's others that will change their form. And that's really what I'd like to provide some clarification around. Sexual lust is a kind of passion greed for money is a kind of passion lust for fame and recognition.

These are passions that I don't think we have shameless Trevor recognizing that they are definitely they definitely have an unwholesome root to them

Student: and.

Culadasa: I don't think that they're there, the problem of that we're trying to interpret here, but for if we speak in terms of a Buddha or an enlightened being doesn't mean that they're completely emotionless, does it mean they're devoid of all passionates or what exactly does that mean? And there is this touchy little question of, if Buddhas see things as they really are, rather than in terms of all of the projections that our human mind normally creates, which are based in, and our conditioning how.

How do and like being CEO world and how does that compare? So it's away, but the rest of his food

Sometimes it may seem that a [00:05:00] Buddha is somehow inhuman does, if a Buddha is completely free from suffering, then how does a Buddha react to the suffering of others in the world?

So these are all the kinds of questions that come into this and that they really do deserve to be

Student: addressed.

Culadasa: Now, what is a key that can help us to untangle this of debt is the notion of a separate personal self,

Student: Which

Culadasa: I present to you as being. And illusion something that doesn't actually exist at all. Something the mind creates and something that has perhaps served the alternative purposes of our biology, but there is no such self.

We are actually,

Inseparable from however you want to regard it. But it was just saying that we are very much part of the universe and we do not have this kind of distinct separateness that we perceive ourselves to all of the kind of passions, emotions, feelings, and suffering that we were talking about.

It being desirable to be free from. And we would expect an enlightened Dane or a Buddha to be free from our specifically rooted in that delusion and that illusion that we are a substantial enduring separate

Student: entity.

Culadasa: And it's that feeling of separateness that leads to our suffering that leads to unwholesome desires and praisings and passions which in turn lead to us of behaving in ways committing acts of speech and deed that contribute to the further suffering of other things.

This is the passion that is to be overcome. Now, the one of the characteristics. I'm an enlightened being in addition to wisdom, the second main defining characteristic is compassion. There's the word passionate again, but it's in a different context. It Sam, the context of the sensitivity towards, and the caring for others, and essentially we say a Buddha is free from desire.

That's the Buddha still holds the wish for the wellbeing and happiness of others and the end of suffering as August. We can see a distinction there. And if we go from this to the way the Buddha perceives the world and I lightened being in a human body still has a human brain and still has a mind.

That interprets the world from a human perspective.

Student: And,

Culadasa: It should be obvious that and I lied and being

Student: like that is not separate

Culadasa: from the rest of humanity, let alone from anything else in the universe. So we have to, in order to interpret and understand this well, we've had to keep that in mind.

We can't make the mistake of trying to impose certain kinds of interpretations on an enlightened wine that are based and the delusion of separateness and self-worth that we're experiencing ourselves. If we want to understand what it needs to be simultaneously free from suffering. But filled with compassion for the suffering of others.

We have to recognize that this is a being that is not experiencing segregation. So they have wisdom and compassion, what the wisdom does for them, that it has eliminated the delusion actually wisdom in the sense means the absence of the ignorance that the ignorance of cyber class and the ignorance, I think.

The wisdom also goes beyond the appearances of the world, the way that human mind constructs it, which is the appearance of being made up of separate entities. Some of [00:10:00] these entities are sent in veins. Each of these sentence ventings is a separate sentence. And each of the separate S E each a example of the separate sentence endures its own suffering and the enlightened mind sees beyond that.

So the enlightened mind recognizes simultaneously both that suffering itself is an illusion. Part of the larger delusion, but that also from the point of view of the sentience that sees itself as separate and experiences, the suffering, it is still real. So it is both real and not real simultaneously.

It's a paradoxical from not from the point of view, ordinary way of saying things, but a carried obstacle kind of situation,

Student: in a sense,

Culadasa: so glued to, to live in the world and interact with him and beings, but at the same time to be enlightened, to dwell and Nirvana. And there is a very, I think, very appropriate description that, I got it from Gretchen repor shade, but I've used it over and over again. And that's it.

Bonnie and speech have a Buddha live in the marketplace, follow the mine to the Buddha dwells Xanax. And this speaks to this sort of of by Vaillant characteristic of the Buddha's consciousness, which on the one hand is perceiving the true nature of reality, which liberates the Buddhists mind so that the Buddhist mind no longer generates the natural state of suffering

Student: and

Culadasa: also provides the Buddha's mind with the wisdom that understands the emptiness or the suffering of others, but at the same time, while not believing it to be alternate reality still knows and understands the name.

Of a re of the relative reality that is higher ordinary human experience. The Buddha's mind is still creating the representation of a world of desperate suffering entities.

Not too, this is something that we can understand too easily, but at the same time, it's, it is, was in the realm of our ability to talk about.

Student: So there are some examples

Culadasa: that can help us to see this okay. The suffering of another the compassion of a Buddha. And at the same time, the wisdom of a Buddha that, that frees them from suffering and an example you might think.

A mother and a young child and the young child for whatever reason is

Frightened or upset or, bang their knee and it hurt. And so they're crying and everything. The mother knows that there's really nothing wrong, has compassion for the fact that the child is upset and crying and comforts the child. But the mother is not suffering the way, if the child's knee were gashed open and bleeding, or if the child were, if there was some real cause for the child's suffering and upset, and the mother would experience a lot of of empathy and suffering of her own through her identity with Bishop.

And the example we're using to help us understand the relationship of the Buddha for the suffering of others. There is both the caring and compassion for the fact that the child is upset and is experiencing these emotions. But the mother, while she comforts the child has a smile on her face, perhaps even chuckles whatever, knowing that this will pass that this is it.

There's no real cause for that. There's no real harm that it is purely something that's taking place in a child's mind. And you see the kind of connection between

Student: there.

It just

Culadasa: occurs to me that maybe continuing the same type of example,[00:15:00]

Student: A loving parent

Culadasa: observes with detachment and amusement. Many of the things that the fantasies that children engage in, the things that they entertain themselves and enjoy or they things that they wrestle and struggle with that they're not the serious things of the world that us adults deal with.

And so a loving parent can observe them with detached amusement and a kind of empathy, sympathetic joy for the pleasures and so on and so forth. And I think this is also how to understand the experience of a person who is no longer

Student: subject to.

Culadasa: Believing in the ultimate reality and grasping to the ideas of good and bad, and this just is terrible.

It's just happening and it's wonderful. It's happening. And the sorts of things that we normally do the combination of wisdom and compassion can doesn't need to or all of these with the combination of wisdom and compassion and this sort of polyvalent way of seeing reality in both its ultimate in relative terms can allow an enlightened being to appreciate the, all of the many different dimensions of the human experience, pres the world without attachment.

Without entering into suffering because of time and without feeling aroused, two passions of the form of trying to make things be some way, rather than the way they are out of a compulsive desire for support feminine that is not, or a compulsive perforation to the way of saying

Student: SAR,

which would

Culadasa: be conditioning, which is conditioning. Yeah. So those desires and aversions are conditioning.

So let us speak a little more. Tell me a little more of your thoughts from last weekend and how they might be the same or different after what I've just said.

Student: So now I understand

it's not a

Culadasa: refreshing, it's not a witch, you're not suppressing that's right. You're absolutely not repressing these things to the extent that they follow way following naturally by themselves as a result of the practice.

Student: But

Culadasa: the aspect of the practice of leach. So they're falling away is mindful awareness.

It's seeing them more and more as they actually are and seeing and understanding both where they come from and the kind of results that they produce. We see I, I think I. I think a good illustration of this in a sense it's almost a metaphor for all of our other suffering and life is the way we react to physical pain because we take an experience of physical pain and through our resistance to it, we make it into, we create all kinds of mental suffering that is unnecessary, and it's not intrinsic to the experience of physical pain itself.

And in meditation, this is one of the things that we have the opportunity to begin discovering fairly early on in the practice, because it is pain and discomfort associated with city. And so this gives us the opportunity to take that as an object, examine it, mindful it, and what makes the difference there is when we began to see.

Student: How

Culadasa: are our natural reaction and our resistance lakes, the makes the experience of the discomfort so much worse than it is in and of itself. And this is really the same principle that works with all of these other unwholesome mental states, emotional states is that by seeing them and understanding them as they really are and saying, where are they coming from and saying, what kind of results they produced, they can to start falling [00:20:00] away and themselves.

So we don't have to request anything. And also we don't have to expect that, that we're engaged in a process. That's going to lead us to be, some sort of flat out emotional feeling being because we, we aren't we

Student: will have, I agree,

Culadasa: Richness of human experience, but without just simply without the attachment, without the self center attachments and all of the suffering that, that brings

just you first, and then you,

Student: I think I'm going to have a little bit of difficulty

Culadasa: formulating this, but there's some relation could what to Forrest as to what you explained. And this has

Student: to do with suffering. And I'm thinking of your

Culadasa: example about the mother but I'm thinking of examples

Student: of much more extreme suffering and what brings it to mind precisely if it's the earthquake in Haiti.

And that's where ism fails me, because how could you possibly comprehend this or perceive this as a provocation of

your

Culadasa: mind? Th the, what

Student: those people are going through as a Buddhist

Culadasa: how do you approach it? And what you said about

Student: the border

Culadasa: it's mine lives and know about Nirvana and his body is in the market.

I can see some of that before for us.

Student: We're not there, you know what it does. It doesn't bring me any relief. What I know about what is in, how do you comprehend that? How can you approach it?

Culadasa: There's several different things here. First of all just to be clear before we look at the situation or the people of the suffering of the people in Haiti, what did, does it do van, if your mind makes you miserable here in Tucson,

Student: I'm thinking more about

Culadasa: there is this. Yeah, I'll get to that. But first let's just be clear that making ourselves miserable,

Because somebody else is suffering, doesn't really count down.

Okay. The one possible positive outcome that has is that

Student: it

Culadasa: arouses in us the compassionate desire to do anything that we can do. So if there's some way that we can. Contribute then that is the only positive outcome. And if you can have the compassionate desire to help without yourself feeling miserable than them, we definitely hit.

Okay. All right. Now the only way that the only way that you can

Student: really,

you have to put

Culadasa: yourself and the place of other suffering beings, and you have to do

Student: that

Culadasa: with the kind of acquired wisdom that comes from spiritual practice in order

Student: to see

Culadasa: their situation in a different way. Look at your own situation,

Student: Your own suffering

Culadasa: maybe you haven't ever been a part of a natural disaster, but you have suffered some degree of physical pain and injury in your life.

I'm

Student: sure you have suffered

Culadasa: loss of people that you were attached to in one

Student: form or another.

Culadasa: You have experienced uncertainty about the future. You've experienced pain and anxiety. So all of these things that we know what these people in Haiti are experiencing, you have experienced to one degree or another.

Student: Pam your problem

Culadasa: in life is that when you have those experiences and you see them and the enlightened and diluted way,

which is to say that you've seen them from the point of view of this [00:25:00] particular self, why is this happening to me or this shouldn't be happening to me, or, wishing not to be the person to him. This was happening.

Student: The

Culadasa: suffering of the people on Hyde T is due to their having exactly the same perception, perceiving themselves as a separate self. And this is happening to me. Yes. My leg is crushed it's. My daughter is. Yes, my home that's destroyed. It's my future. That's uncertain. That's my mind, but it's still the fear,

Student: right?

You may never have that

Culadasa: such for some many different severe causes of suffering coming upon you at one time as they are, but you've had all of the signs. And the problem with the human condition is that all of us are going to have these kinds of things. It's inescapable. It is part of what it means to be a human bed.

So really the only difference is to degree. It's a difference of degree.

Student: And

Culadasa: now this is part of our mistaken thinking is to recognize it. It's a matter of degree and then say I, this separate cell only had more this and less of that. In other words, it's all a question of degree. And I put myself down here the other end of the pain scale and the opposite end of the pleasure scale.

And this is what leads to the idea that, if you've got, you got the right job, more money, the right partner, these things happening, that you'll be happy. And all of our suffering comes from trying to escape from the pains and the problems are inevitably a part of life. And the more we interpret those in terms of, I need mine, this separateness, then the more painful that it

Student: becomes.

Culadasa: So you can feel compassion for the suffering of others on the basis of your own suffering. If you become, as you become more wise and you realize that your own suffering comes out of this attachment to the self, and as you began to learn to let go of that, then you also can understand how the suffering of others is created in the same way and can be overcome you the same way now.

Yes, it's hard to imagine yourself at a place where you no longer identify with the body that experiences the pain and in that special way,

Student: And that you no longer

Culadasa: have a mind that is going to. January, all of these kinds of mental suffering and response to the circumstances that this particular body mind complex finds itself.

Yeah. That may be difficult for you to imagine in its entirety, but that's where you want to go. And that's what we mean by saying things as they really are. If you see things as they really are than physical plane is just another experience. We are all going to die

Student: and that

Culadasa: probably,

And for most people, death is going to be pretty painful, as your kidneys shut down, your liver stops working when you feel safe everybody has been sick and there, what it feels like to have things in your body not going right.

But most of the time it was like, you knew, or at least hoped that was going to turn it around, but there's going to come the day where you feel the changes taking place in your body. And that you're not ever going to come back from that, the gripping pain of a heart attack and that love and a realization that is just going to keep going until it's all over with that sort of thing.

So we're all confronted with this and all of our suffering, when I use the word suffering, I'm really thinking of the suffering that the mind creates, not the physical pain, because I know that the physical. It's not really a problem. The only problem is the suffering that the mind case in response to the physical pain, in response to the various kinds of losses and fears and [00:30:00] anxieties and things like that.

Student: And so

it

Culadasa: is in that sense

Student: that

Culadasa: if I think so, the people who are going through the kind of suffering that you're thinking, I feel compassion. I feel compassion for what they are experiencing. I know that their minds are generating powerful states of suffering. I also know that some of them are discovering within themselves even while this suffering is going on.

That of nets. I'm touchable, stillness. That's going to give them the strength to come through this. And I know that is the real nature of what is happening and in that situation,

Student: I wish

Culadasa: on the one hand, but these people would not have to experience the things that they do. I would wish that no human being, no sentient being would have to experience the various kinds of pain and loss that

Student: are part of being

Culadasa: what we are, but that's not possible. I further wish that the minds of all of these sentient things could be liberated from the delusion.

Which creates all of the mental suffering as a result of this.

Student: Okay.

Culadasa: So I experience the human emotion of compassion, sympathy, a wish, and a desire,

Student: That,

Culadasa: That people be relieved of this kind of suffering and at the same time to the degree that and what are the situations, there's something that I can do to change things. And I'd like to do that. I hopefully would do that, but at the same time, I can see that their situation is exactly the same as mine.

Student: And

Culadasa: to the degree that I have been liberated from my own suffering through seeing it illusory nature, I know that their suffering is likewise and inclusion. I don't know that this necessarily helps you, but I want you to understand that the Buddhist perspective is not one of dispassion and a sense of coldness for an uncaring.

It's one of seeing beyond the chair of the person's

Student: situation.

Culadasa: Does that help,

Student: Yeah,

Culadasa: It is a difficult, it is a difficult issue, but it's an important issue. Yeah.

Student: Most

Culadasa: of the examples that you use before or what people would consider negative emotional states find what we were saying. Positive emotions, joy, happiness satisfaction. In terms and, in terms of what our goal is satisfaction is a really good word to start with because,

All of our problems stem from hard being dissatisfied and what we're after is satisfaction.

What we're after is that state of contentment fulfillment satisfaction. And this is where ha this is what happiness and joy. If you think of, if you think of, I don't know, the first person said, my Knight is a Dalai Lama. He is a smiling happy baby.

Student: Yes he is. And maybe

Culadasa: that's a good illustration too, because he

Student: is

Culadasa: hugely aware of the suffering, but the prison camps and the torture and the repression of his own people and destruction as it Realty, but he is, he's still a happy, joyful vain. And so it's a video should have positive emotions, it could be,

To be freed. All of these negative emotions doesn't mean to be free to the positive emotions. I think that's what you're [00:35:00] saying. And that's absolutely true. Yeah. Yeah. Buddhas are happy games, I like the Chinese smiling, that's

That's the Hamish that that I like that. Yeah. And to put it in a, in another way, too, if you just think about,

we experienced both pleasure and pain yeah. And our

Student: life.

Culadasa: And if we accept both fully means experiencing the pleasure not even just as much as before. It means experiencing the pleasure more fully than you ever have before, because you're not clinging to it because you're not already feeling the penny of knowing that it's gone to pass away or already starting to fail, to be fully present with the pleasure, because you're already thinking about how you might repeat it or continue it or hold onto it, which is what we normally do.

So to be free from clinging and attachment and to be open and accepting of pleasure is to experience it more fully and more totally than ever. On the other hand to be completely open and accepting of pain is to have no resistance to it. And so it is just another experience and he removed that huge amplification factor that comes from our resistance, from our wanting it to stop.

He had to.

Student: Yes. I had a question about

Culadasa: just passion, this count two times 3 cent, it

Student: repeated today. So

Culadasa: on a on this coming Tuesday evening, I'm supposed to for work being two different

Student: places at two different times. So I had to tell tell a professor that I can't be there on Tuesday and they're both kind of important places to be, but I couldn't be in both.

And she was getting really upset

Culadasa: that I

Student: wasn't able to do this. And I wasn't. And it seems like the worst problem for her wasn't that she'd have to.

Culadasa: Work on Tuesday without

Student: me, but then I wasn't getting upset about

Culadasa: this.

Student: I've had this happen recently where from this practice, I'm developing this dispassion and it bothers other people

Culadasa: that they either, I think in this case she just wanted somebody, sympathetically high

Student: emotion at this problem.

Culadasa: What else, sir? It seems uncanny. So exactly that,

Student: that it's often interpreted as some negative

Culadasa: motivation or hope or just simply being uncaring, it's yeah.

Had. You're fine. She wants the sympathy she feels, but the stress and anniversary conditioning is that this is the way you're supposed to respond to these situations. So with stress, what's the matter we're here, are you talking to irresponsible that you don't even feel bad about this?

Student: Exactly.

So

Culadasa: it requires a certain sensitivity towards other people's emotional states and compassion for them,

I wouldn't suggest that you pretend to be upset, but I think that really what the other person needs is just the the sense of. Acknowledgement that, you understand the stress that that it creates.

So that you're, if you don't want to be seen as somebody that's just irresponsible and uncaring. And I said, burn the house down. Oh

Student: yeah, but

I can't help,

Culadasa: but think of something that we discussed previously and I see it as this relates exactly to it. And that's yeah. And so I think this is another reminder that, you use. I need to,

You need to remember to respond as still, fully as you can, to the

The less wholesome methyl states that others otherwise create unintended problems for an NSL

It's learning. It's learning how to share your own at attachments rather than leaving people feeling abandoned in

Student: their attachment.[00:40:00]

Culadasa: But that's, in a sense that's exactly the same thing as what you're talking about is as

Student: to not

Culadasa: to appear to be uncaring as you, because you no longer suffer sympathetically with others

Student: and

Culadasa: no back choosy, achy, breaky, heart referenced. In a sense, that's why I listened to these kinds of brokenhearted love songs,

Student: and I just

Culadasa: see it's a solid about how do we create our own suffering. The person singing the song and the person writing the song in most cases, Did maintenance that right? Although in some cases they do, there are some of those songs that are intentionally showing how we create are suffering.

But even those that are not, that's what they do, you can hear them and you say, oh yeah, I used to do that to myself too. I've been there. I've done that, but you can enjoy this vantage point of being older and wiser or whatever, and you don't have to do that to yourself anymore and realize that other people ultimately not have to do that.

Although from the point of view, where do they are right now, that may be the only

Student: thing that they can do.

Culadasa: And you didn't have to accept that. And other people, I need to have to accept that in yourself. When you find yourself doing the same series yourself, knowing that you don't need to, sometimes you just have to accept it.

I guess that's where I am. I hope I don't stay in this place for very long, but definitely,

See what happens with other people in those terms,

having in a general sense,

Student: if you think of the

Culadasa: universe as a whole, think of it holistically, every part of the is-ness and you don't need to think of this necessarily in. The university and the way to the established view at the moment, we can go beyond the established view of the moment. I say the universe in a sense of business, no matter who's saying it or how they're perceiving it, whatever there is that constitutes the nature of being

Student: that

Culadasa: part of it, that we are knowing and experienced and are experiencing is manifesting in a particular way. And we're a part of that manifestation, the most important thing about our vain or part of that manifestation is our conscious awareness

Student: and.

Culadasa: So one way that can be very helpful when looking at, the suffering of the world as a whole, not just now, but throughout its history and its future potential

Student: is that

the universe is

Culadasa: in the process of being conscious, becoming conscious of itself, becoming self aware. And each of us is like an individual part of that consciousness. And we're all exactly the same in that regard.

Student: The

Culadasa: consciousness that underlies the experience of each of us is absolutely indistinguishable in any regard from the consciousness of anyone else or for that matter.

Any other vein that we see and perceive as being conscious of it as being conscious

Student: and [00:45:00]

Culadasa: this universe, this isn't as being the complex entity that it is now, it has generated the, and it has generated you as a particular psychophysical entity capable of being conscious and capable of viewing the rest of the universe from one particular advantage point. And we already have to accept that he had.

The way that it has gone about doing that is one that makes inevitable,

Student: Pain

Culadasa: and dissolution impermanent. So the passing away, and then the larger scale of its complexity,

Student: there's

Culadasa: going to be varying degrees of the pain, varying degrees of the duration of existence of any one entity, varying degrees of the variety of experiences of which consciousness can partake from any one of these particular vantage

Student: points.

And that is just

inherent

Culadasa: in the way things are. And we can understand that and accept that when we looked at the world,

If we can stay in that view rather than coming back to this, why me pointing to

Student: view that itself,

Culadasa: that we are all the same consciousness in the same consciousness must experience this

Student: reality

Culadasa: in all of its different ways and all of its different manifestations, and that we are not this particular local eyes manifestation.

Don't identify with that.

If you can liberate yourself from all of the suffering that your mind creates,

Student: you still remain.

Culadasa: The particular conditioned entity that you are with whatever duration of existence and whatever evolution of circumstances and whatever degree of pain that is associated with what you are or what particular vantage point that you represent.

Yes.

Student: But

Culadasa: if you can't succeed in not identifying what's that as cell, but identify with the totality of what is, and most particularly with

Student: that

that

Culadasa: the consciousness itself, that is really the root of what you are. You are the consciousness. That experiences that you are not the experience, your own into consciousness. And although

Student: in

Culadasa: the temporary condition that you manifest as right now, you may not be able to access the totality of that consciousness.

That doesn't mean that you cannot recognize yourself as being a part of that.

Student: So

all of the

Culadasa: problems that we

Student: deal with

Culadasa: as a separate self and athlete are exactly the same problems that we're confronted with. When we look at a world made up of many separate selves and entities. And so since the problems are the same, the solutions are this. And the solutions are really the the attainment of the kind of wisdom that a lot of our ordinary limited way of seeing things,

Student: the

Culadasa: mystical experience of oneness, but not self being beyond both existence and non-existence.

That's. That's where all of the answers are. And that's where, you to be simultaneously in this place of no separate cell and at one with everything, but at the same time,

Student: Living

Culadasa: the lie of the activity that you are to the absolute fullest best possible with, [00:50:00] and the circumstances that you find yourself.

And that is really what it's all about. But Buddha, they have for 80 years, 45 of which were

Student: after a

Culadasa: attained, this realization and that body and that mind functioned in the world has this best possible expression of that individual circumstance. And in spite of the fact that the mind of the Buddha throughout the body and space of the Buddha functioned in the marketplace or in the world, but the mind is included well, enter that,

Student: That's what

Culadasa: this is all about to get

Student: to that place.

I understand

Culadasa: that the Buddha died of food poisoning at Haiti and this back-end lady. And I wondered about that since there are yogis that are able to pass poison through their systems without being affected and do things like that. I would think Buddha just would have

Student: cleaned up

Culadasa: the food. As this

Student: even Buddha's can live forever.

Culadasa: And you might need very interested in reading the Maha in Nirvana Sutra, which is it's quite a lengthy Sutra. It's poly it's a Sanskrit version is about that thick, but it's poly version is, goes on for quite a few pages. You might be interested in reading it's wonderful.

It's one of my favorite sutures, but M in the suitor he's 80 years old and remember he's been sleeping on the ground under trees for, or two of those years,

Student: and

Culadasa: he actually makes the conscious decision to to leave the world. And this is quite a while before he actually goes and is served the meal by current the Smith, which is this.

Yeah, but then the positive is there. He gave the instructions that he was to be the only one to eat that dish and that everybody else was feed other pans and whatever he had left over was supposed to be buried. No, rather than anybody eating it. So this would suggest that he knew full well, the danger of the food that he ate and that there was a conscious decision that it was time.

It's in the suture, the states that very clearly, and there's a description of him making the decision every day, but,

Yeah, Ramana Maharshi died of cancer when he was 70. For example, we could find all kinds of, th there is a book about how how great games die. That's launched to the library here. Actually you can't read it. Call I bring it back because I'm traveling, but I'll bring it back really soon, but you know what, but you can get many things from that book.

One of the things you'll get real, look at it and say, gee and widens beings die of all the same things that ordinary people, cancer, heart attacks, poisoning, just everything all sorts of things. The point of spiritual realization, isn't, isn't that you're going to live forever or even particularly longer than anyone else.

Student: I also, haven't been to India. It's pretty impressive that he could last eight years there before getting serious food poisoning.

Culadasa: that's supernatural power.

Anyway this was a very good discussion. I thought I found it interesting. Started off with saying, carry through on, I think what is an important and somewhat difficult point to, to reconcile ourselves, which is our potential for our own transcendence of all sorts. And the fact that at the same time, but world continues to be filled with suffering.[00:55:00]

Student: Well,

Culadasa: it's 8 42, so we'd probably

Student: let you go.

Culadasa: And as I said earlier, we won't be doing the class next week, but we will the week after. And I hope you'll be able to come to the to the weekend teaching X three camp, I thought, and in a sense, this was a nice warm up to, the what is that life I show, I care

able to come to the entire weekend,

Student: come to Friday night

Culadasa: and come to any part of it. Yeah.

Student: The Friday meditation for next week?

Culadasa: The Friday morning meditation. Yeah I'm not going to come in until Friday afternoon, so I guess that will be canceled as well, unless somebody else would you like to and lead it or you don't have time to stay for the whole thing? Can't do the whole thing.

So is there anybody who is pretty and would like to leave three sets on Friday morning? Okay. I should have asked earlier. Okay. All right. So I think that's it for tonight. And so thank you very much.


Automated transcription

It was wonderful seeing everybody socializing and having such a good time there on that break. I. Almost... Quieter around. We'll stop bad breaking it up. So I hope everyone's saying really well this evening. And I'm wondering... I if anybody has any questions or thoughts, maybe some thoughts coming out of what we talked about last week or anything else that to start off our discussion this evening. Gotcha. So we were talking about the agent breaking part last week. Right? Yeah. Saturday thing. Mh.

So I feel like there's the schedule of this dispatching that we're supposed to attain, But I... So I was questioning in relationships where he have the session. Seems ideal to have pattern. Adjust. Yes. Okay. So well, if repeat that... Yes Gotcha And what everything do. I I i can try to repeat that. There is I was talking about the the emotional aspect of the being human and the the path that we experienced and some positive aspects of that. And what I hear you bringing up is that there is this impression that in in spiritual practice like buddhism that And he used the word supposed to.

So I thought this very senior okay does see how was supposed to develop dispatch. And on the other hand, there is a sense that we have that passion also can be a good thing too and and in terms of, you know, our human and social values that that our senses in which we put a positive value on passion. Right? So I I I think that's what you're asking about. And that's a very good thing to talk about. It is true. That the goal of this path is to free ourselves from from passions from certain kinds and passion.

See there's different ways that we can use the word. And so you know, we we do have to be clear on what we mean by passion and which passions that we're referring to. But... But definitely, the words that are used are dispatched to become dis passionate. And to overcome our attachments. Well of course, we associate love and things like that as being an attachment. And so where what really are are we talking about where we're trying to go here? And let's be careful about how we use lures words and also about ideas as supposed to.

Because also part of the path isn't that we are supposed to. Somehow abolish from ourselves, certain kinds of emotions and feelings. But there are certain kinds of emotions that through to practice, we will we will overcome them. They will they will disappear and there's others that will change their. And that's that's really what I'd like to provide some clarification around. On sexual lust is a kind of passion. Greed for money is a kind of passion. Lust for fame and recognition. These are passions that I don't think we have Changed much trouble recognizing that they are definitely they definitely have an un route to.

And I don't think that they're they're the problem of that we're trying to interpret here. But for... Can we speak in terms of a buddha or an enlightened game? Doesn't mean that they're completely emotion? Does it mean they're devoid of all passions? Or what exactly does that does that mean? And so this this touchy little question, you know, if if buddha is see things as they really are rather than in terms of all of the projections that our human mind normally creates, which are based in in our conditioning.

How do how do and light and being see your. And how does that compare both the way the the rest of the food. You know? Sometimes it may seem that a buddha is somehow inhuman. Does... If a buddha is completely free from suffering, then how does a buddha react to the suffering of others in the world? You know So the these are all the kinds questions that come into this and that they they really do deserve to be addressed. Now what is a key that to help us to un obtain the list of debt? Is the the notion of a separate personal cell.

Which I present to you as being and illusion something that doesn't actually exist at all something the mind creates and something that has perhaps served the alternative purposes of our biology, but there is no such self. We are actually inseparable from however you want to regard it, but if we just say... And we we are very much part of the universe and we do not have this kind of distinct secret that we perceive ourselves to. All of the kind of passions, emotions, feelings and suffering that we're talking about it being desirable to be free from and we would expects an enlightened and being or rebooted at be free refund are specifically rooted in that delusion.

In that illusion that we are a substantial enduring separate entity and it's a feeling second that leads to are suffering that leads to un hold desires and cravings and passions, which in turn lead to us of behaving in ways committing acts of speech indeed contribute to the further suffering of either bank. This is this is the passion that is to be overcome. Now the... One of the characteristics I like and being, in addition to wisdom of, the second main defining characteristic is compassion Well there's the word passion again, but it's in a different context.

It's in the context of the sensitivity towards and the caring for others. And essentially, we say Buddha is free from desire that the buddha still holds the wish for the well being and happiness of others in the end of suffering as others. So we can see a a distinction there. And if we go from from this to to the way the Buddha perceives the world. And I'd like being know, human body still has a human brain and still has in mind that interprets the world from a human perspective. And should be obvious that that...

And I like being like that. Is that separate from the rest of humanity let alone from anything else in the universe. So we have to in order to interpret and understand this Well, we've gotta keep that in mind. We we can't make the mistake of trying to to impose certain kinds of interpretations on an enlightened line that are based in the delusion of synchronous and self that we're experiencing ourselves. If we want to understand what it needs to be simultaneously free from suffering, but filled with compassion for the suffering of others, We have to recognize that This is a being that is not experiencing separation.

So they have wisdom and compassion. What the wisdom does for that it it has eliminated the delusion. Actually, wisdom in the sense needs the absence of the ignorance. That a ignorance of sacrifice. And the ignorance of being a separate so The wisdom also goes beyond the appearances of the world, the way that human might constructs it, which is the appearance of being made up of separate entities Some of these entities or sentient beings, each of these sentient beings is a separate sentence and each of this separate he each example of the separate sentient endure it's own suffering.

And the enlightened mine sees beyond death. So the enlightened mine recognizes simultaneously, both that suffering itself is an illusion, you know, a part of a larger delusion. But but also from the point of view of the sentence that sees itself as separate and experiences the suffering, it is still real. So it he he is both real and not real simultaneously, he's kind of of paradox dr. Mh turned up from the point of view ordinary wave sink that's a paradox obstacle on a situation. You sense To live in the world and interact with human beings, but at the same time to be enlightened to dwell and Nirvana.

And and there is a very, I think, very appropriate description that, you know, I I got it from gretchen, but I've used it over and over again, and that's the the body and speech of buddha. Live in the marketplace while the mine of the buddha dwell. And this speaks to this sort of body characteristic of the buddha consciousness, which on the one hand is proceeding and the true nature of reality, because liberate the buddha mind so that the Buddhist mine no longer generates the mental state of suffering.

And also provides they buddhist this mind with the wisdom that understands the anti emptiness of the suffering of others. But at the same time, while i'm not believing it to the ultimate reality, still knows and understands the nature. Of the relative reality, but that is higher ordinary human experience. The mood is mine is still creating the representation of a world of decorative suffering entities. Not that this is something that we can understand too easily, but at the same time, it's, you know, it it is was within the realm of our ability to to talk about.

So there are some examples that can help us to see this. I... Okay. So suffering in another the compassion of Ib buddha and at the same time, the wisdom of a buddha that frees them suffering. And an example, you might think of a mother and a young child. And the young child for whatever reason is frightened or upset or... Yeah. Banged their knee and it hurt and and so they're product. Can i. The mother knows that there's really nothing. Has compassion for the fact that the child is upset and crying.

And comforts the child. But the mother is not suffering the way, you know, if the child's knee were dashed open and bleeding, or if the child were... you know, if there were some real cause for the child suffering and I've said, then the mother would experience a lot of of empathy and suffering of her own through her identity with the child. But in the example, we're using to help us understand the relationship chip of the buddha for the suffering of others. There is both the caring and compassion.

For the fact that the child is upset and is experiencing these emotions. That the mother while, she pampers the child has a smile on her face, perhaps even chuckle, whatever knowing. That that this will pass that this is that there's no real cause for it that there's no real harm that it is surely something that's taking place in the child's one. And you see the kind of connection there's one there? It just occurs to me that maybe continuing the same. Time of example. A loving parent, observe with detachment and amusement.

Many of the things the the fantasies that children engage in the things that they entertain themselves and enjoy or the things that they wrestle and and struggle with that had the serious things of the world that us adults and deal with. And so so a love current can observe them with detached amusement and a kind of of empathy, sympathy sympathetic joy for the for the pleasures and and so on and so forth. And I think... This is also how to understand the experience of a person who is no longer subject to believing in the alternate reality and grasping to the ideas of good and bad and this this is terrible it's just happening and it's wonderful with this happening and the sorts of things that we normally only do.

The combination wisdom of compassion. Can. That doesn't need to... Or at least... The combination of wisdom and compassion and this sort of body way of seeing reality in both its ultimate and relative terms. Can't allow and like being to appreciate the all of the many different dimensions. Of the human experience because the world without attaching to them without entering into suffering because of them and without being aroused to passions of the form of trying to vape things be some, rather than the the way they are out of out of a a compulsive desire for for forthcoming nvidia is not or a compulsive version to the way things are.

Which would be condition. Which which is conditioning? Yes. Those the desires and inversion are conditioning. So so let let us speak a little more tell me a little more of your thoughts from last week and and and how they might be the same or different after what I've just said. So now I understand. It's not a refreshing. It's not a good. You're not. Suppressing. You're that's right. You're absolutely not rep. These things to they sent that they fall away fall away naturally by themselves. As a result of of the practice.

But The aspect of the practice of leads to their following right is mindful awareness. It's seen them more and more as they actually are and seeing and understanding both where they come from and the kind of results that they produce. Now, we see... I I I think an a good illustration of this. In a sense, it's almost the metaphor for all of our other suffering in life. Is the way we react to physical pain. Because we take an experience a physical pain and through our resistance to it, we make it into...

We create all kinds of mental suffering that is unnecessary and it's not and intrinsic to the experience of physical planning itself. And in meditation, you know, this is one of the things that we have the opportunity to begin discovering fairly early on the practice because of is paying a discount of associated the setting. And so this gives us the opportunity to take that as an object and examine it mindful. And what makes the difference there is when we begin to see how our our eventual reaction and our resistance makes the makes the experience of the this discomfort so much worse, than it it is in and of itself.

And this is this is really the same principle that works with all of these other wholesome mental states and emotional states. Is by seeing them and understanding them, as they really are and saying where they from and saying what kind of results they produce they can to start following away in themselves. So we don't have to request anything. And also, we don't have to expect that that we're engaged in the process that's gonna lead us to be, you know, some sort of emotional un feeling being because we we aren't at all.

We will have a great richness of the human experience. But without just simply without the attachment without the self center attachment and all of the suffering that that brings. Just you first send that here? Okay. Go ahead. I think I'm gonna have a little bit of difficulty formulating this, but... There's some relationships to what to what forest asked in what you explained. And this has to do with suffering. Yeah. And I'm thinking of your example about the mother. But but I'm thinking of examples of much more extreme suffering.

Yes. And and what brings it to mine precisely is is earthquake and Haiti. Yeah. Angela that. And that's where what isn't fails me? Mh. Because how how could you possibly comprehend this or perceive this as as a fabrication of your mind. I mean, the... What those people are going through? As buddhist, how how do you approach it and and and and, you know, Under... What you said of about the buddha mine liven about Nirvana and his body is in the market. I can see some of that before for us. We'll we're not there.

You know, i it it doesn't bring me any relief what I know about what is? How do you comprehend that? How can you how can you approach it? Well, said it's several different things here. First of all, Just just to be clear before we look at the situation the the the people of the suffering of the people and Hate. What good does it do then? If your mind makes you miserable here Tucson. I'm thinking more about there about okay okay. But just... Yeah. I'll I'll answer that. But first let's let's just be clear.

That. Making ourselves miserable because somebody else is suffering. Doesn't really count down. Mh. Okay. The one possible positive outcome that that has is that it in us the compassionate desire to do anything that we can do. So if there's some way that we can sure. Mh. Then that is the only positive outcome. And if you can have the compassionate desire to help without yourself feeling miserable then. Then we definitely hit. Okay. Alright. Now the only way that The only way that you can really you have to put yourself in the place of other suffering beings and you have to do that.

With the kind of acquired wisdom that kind spiritual practice in order to see their situation in a different way. So look at your own situation. Yeah. Your own suffering. Maybe you haven't ever been a part of a natural disaster. But you have suffered some degree physical pain and injury in your life. Not sure. You have suffered loss of people that you were attached to and one form another You have experienced uncertainty about the future. You've experienced pain and anxiety. So all of these things that we know when these people hate are experiencing.

You have experience to one degree or another. And your problem. In life is that when you have those experiences and you see them in the I didn't like and diluted way. Which is to say that you've seen them from the point of view of this particular self and why is this happening to to me or this shouldn't be happening to me. Or... know, wishing not to be the person to him this was happening. The suffering of the people on High chi is due to they're having exactly the same perception. As perceiving themselves as a set so.

And this is happening and it it's my leg is crushed. It's my daughter that's dead. Yes. My home story. It's my future that's uncertain. It's my mind that is filled with fear. Right? You may never have that such some maybe different severe causes of suffering coming upon you at one time, as are. But you've had all of the sent and the problem with the human condition is that all of us are going to have these kinds of things. So is. It is part of what it needs to be in bid. So really, the only difference is the degree.

It's a difference of degree. And now this is part of our mistake in thinking is to recognize it it's a matter of degree and then say, well, if i, this separate cell only had more exists and less of that. And other words, you know, it's all a question of degree, so i wanna put myself down here other end of the paint scale and and the opposite end of the closure scale. And this is what leads to the idea that know if you've got they got the right job, more money, the right partner, these things happening, you know, that you'll be happy.

And all of submarine times from trying to escape from the pains and the problems are inevitably heart of life. And the more we interpret those in terms of of me mine, because separate. Then the more painful that it becomes. So you can feel compassion for the suffering of other on the basis of your own suffering if you'd become as you become more wise, and you realize that your own suffering comes out of this attachment to the self and as you begin to learn to let go of that, and you also can understand how the suffering of others.

Is created in the same way and can be overcome in the same way. Now, yes. It's hard to imagine yourself. Out a place. Where you no longer identify with the body of experiences the pain and in that special way and that you no longer have a mind that is going to generate all of these kinds of mental suffering in response to the circumstances that this particular body mine complex. Finds itself. Yeah. That may be difficult for you to imagine in its entirety, but that's where you want to go. And that's what we mean by seeing things as they really are.

Give you see things as they really are, then physical pain is just another experience. We are all going to die. And, you know, that probably, you know, And for most people, death gonna be pretty painful. You know, as your kidneys shut down, your liver stops working, you when you feel things I don't everybody has been sick and know what it feels like to have things in your body, not doing. Right. But most of the time, it was like, you know, you knew or at least hoped that that was gonna turn around.

But there's gonna come the day where you feel the changes taking in place in your body. And you know that you're not able you're gonna time back from that. You know, the the the gripping pain of heart attack and that moment on a realization that that It's just gonna keep going that right until it's all over with. That sort of thing. So we're all confronted with this. And all of our suffering, I when I'm usually were suffering, I'm really thinking, of the suffering that the mind creates, not the physical pain.

Because I know that the physical pain is not really a problem. The only problem is just decipher that the mind case in response to the physical pain. In response to to the various kinds of losses and and peers and anxieties and things like this. And so It is in that sense. That if I think so the people who are going to kind of suffering that you're thinking, I feel compassion I feel compassion for what they are experiencing. I know that their minds are generating powerful space of suffering. I know that some of them are discovering within himself even while the suffering is going on, that admits untouchable stillness.

That's going to give them the strength to come through this. And I know that that is the real nature of what is happening in in that situation. I wish on the one hand, but these people would not have to experience the things that they do. I would wish that know human being no sentient would have to experience the various highs of pain and loss that are part of of being what we are. Mh But that's not possible. I heard wish that the minds of all these sentient things could be liberated from the delusion.

Which creates all of the mental suffering as a result of this. Okay. So So I experience with him and emotion of compassion, sympathy they wish and the desire that that people be relieved of this kind of separate. And at the same time. To the degree that... In in what are situations with something that I can do to change things? And I would like to do that. Hopefully would do that. But at the same time, I can see that their situation is exactly the same as my own. And to the degree that I had been blueberries from my own suffering right.

Yeah. Through seeing it's a nature, yeah. I know that they're suffering as likewise lose. I don't know that is necessarily capture. But I want you to understand that the boo perspective is not one of this action in a sense of cold for an caring. It's one a C on the of the personal configuration. Does that sound? Yeah. You know Yeah It is it is a difficult. It is a difficult issue. Yes. It's an important issue too. Yeah. Most of the examples that you used before were what people would consider negative emotional space?

Where? Yeah. But I flying that what change it positive about shouldn't this. Joy happiness satisfaction not. Well in terms and and you know, in in terms of what our our goal is. Satisfaction is a really good word to start with because all of our problems, Sam from are being dissatisfied. And what we're after is satisfaction. But we're after is that state of contentment fulfillment satisfaction. And this is where this is what happiness and joy from. So, you know, if if you think of You think of...

I know, the first person comes to my mind is a Dolly lam. He is a smiling, happy day. She... Oh. Yes. He is... And maybe I took any illustration too because he is hugely aware of the the suffering the the prison camps and the torture and the rep of his own people and destruction and cruelty. But he is he's is still a a happy joyful being, And so it's a so the positive emotions, you know, could be To be freed of of these negative emotions, doesn't mean to be free of the positive emotions. And i I think that's what you're saying.

You know that's absolutely true. Yeah. Yeah. Buddha are happy beans. You know, I I like the Chinese. Of smiling you. That's That's that's the image that that I like. That... Yeah. And and to put it in a in another way too. If you just think about... We experienced both pleasure and paying yeah in her life. And if we except both fully. Means experiencing the pleasure not not even just as much as before. It means experiencing the pleasure more fully than you ever had before because you're not cling to it, because you're not already feeling the penny of knowing that it's going to pass away or already starting to fail to be fully present with the pleasure because you're already thinking about how you might repeat it or continue it or hold on to it.

Which is what we normally do. So to be free from cleaning and attachment and to be open and accepting your pleasure is to experience it more fully and more totally. Than ever. On the other hand to be completely open and accepting of pain is to have no resistance to it And so it is just another experience, and he removed that huge amplification factor that comes from our resistance from our running at to our activity. Mh. Yes. So I had a question about just passion this account few times recently saying.

It repeated today. So on on on this coming Tuesday evening, I'm supposed for work being two different places at two different times. Yeah. So I had to tell a tell professor that I can't be there on Tuesday and they're both kind of important places to be, but I couldn't be in both. And she was getting really upset. That that I wasn't able to do this. And I wasn't. And it seems like the worst problem for her wasn't that she'd have to work on Tuesday without me, but that I wasn't getting upset about this.

Correct. I've had this happen times recently where like, from this practice I'm developing this passion. Mh and it bothers other people Mh. Mh. That they they... I mean, either I I think in this case, she just wanted somebody, sympathetic hire emotion of this problem. Say? It seems So exactly. That... And it's it's often interpreted as some some negative motivation. Yeah. Are for just simply being I'm tearing, you know, it it it's... Yeah. And different. She wants the sympathy. She feels to the the stress and and for conditioning is that this is the way you're supposed to respond to these situations just so is with with stress.

What's the matter we're here? You know, are he so totally irresponsible that you you you don't even feel bad about this. Exactly. So they requires a certain. Sensitivity towards other people's emotional states and and compassion for them. You know, I wouldn't suggest that you pretend to be upset. But I think that really what what the other person needs is just the the the sense of acknowledged my that. You know, you you understand the stress that that it creates know. So that you're you don't wanna be seen a somebody that's just irresponsible and I'm reoccurring and I, i so burned the house down.

Oh well. Yeah. That's fine. Yeah. Right. I can't help the. Thank you. Something that we discussed previously. And I see that this relates exactly to it, and that's Yeah. And so i I think this is another reminder that, you know, you you need to... You need to remember to respond as skill fully as you can to Okay. Yeah. The less wholesome natural states of others. Gotcha Otherwise, you should just create unintended problems for to sell. Yeah. Yeah. It's it's working it's learning how to share your own attachment rather leaving other people feeling abandoned in their attachment.

But that's... you know, in a since that's exactly the same thing. That's what you're talking about is as to not to to appear to be un. Because you... Because you no longer suffer sympathetic with others. And... Know, back back to the ach breaking heart reference. I mean, in in a sense, that's why I... I I listened to these kinds of broken hearted lu songs, you know, we're And I just see it's a song about how do we create our own separate? I mean, the the person singing the song and the person writing is on in most cases, didn't mean it that Right?

Although in some cases they do. You know, there are some of those songs that are are intentionally showing how we create or separate mh. But even those that are not, that's what they do. You know, you hear on And six. Oh, yeah. I used to do that to myself too. I've been there. I that. You know. But you can't enjoy this Vantage point of being older and wiser or whatever and... Recognize you don't have to do that to your yourself anymore and realize that other people ultimately don't have to do that.

Although from the point of view, where they are right now, that may be the only thing that they can do. And you do have to accept that in other people. And you do have to accept that in your yourself. When you when you find yourself, doing things to yourself and knowing that you don't need to. Sometimes you just have to accept it well guess that's where I am i hope to stay in this place for. You know, But definitely, see what happens with other people and those terms. And then in a general sense.

If you think of the universe as a whole, think of it holistically. Every part of the is. And and you don't need to think of this necessarily in terms of the universe and and the way that sort of the established view at the moment. We can go beyond the established view of the moment that i'd say. The universe of sense of business, you know, no matter who's saying it or how they're perceiving it. Whatever there is, that constitutes the nature of being. That part of it that we are going in experience and and are experiencing is manifesting in a particular way, and we're a part of that manifestation.

The most important thing about our being a part of that manifestation is our conscious awareness. And so one way that can be very helpful when looking at, you know, the the suffering of world as a whole not just now, but throughout its history and yeah, it's future potential. Is. The universe is in the process of being conscious becoming conscious of itself, they becoming self aware. And each of us is quite an individual gift of that. Consciousness. And we're all exactly the same in that regard.

You know, the the consciousness that underlies the experience of each of us is absolutely ins indistinguishable in any regard from the consciousness of anyone else or for that matter any other being that we see and perceive as being conscious of as being conscious. And this universe this is being the complex entity that it is. Now it has generated. V and it has generated you as a particular psycho physical entity capable of being conscious and incapable of viewing the rest of the universe from one particular vantage point.

And we already have to accept that it's the way that it has gone about doing that. Is one that makes inevitable and and dissolution permanent to to passing a away. And then the larger scale of its complexity. There's going to be varying degrees of of the paint varying degrees of the duration of existence of anyone entity. Varying degrees of the variety of experiences of which consciousness can or partake from any one of these particular vantage points. And that is just inherent in the way things are.

And we can understand that and accept that when we looked at the world. If we can stay in that you. Rather than coming back to this y knee point per view of itself. That we are all the same consciousness in the same consciousness must experience this reality in all of its different ways and all all of its different manifestations. And that we are not this particular localized financial manifestation. Don't identify with that. You know If you can liberate yourself from all of the suffering that your mind creates.

You still remain the particular conditioned entity that you are with whatever duration of existence and whatever evolution of circumstances and whatever degree of pain, that is associated with what you what you are, but particular advantage quantity that you represent? Yes. But if you can't succeed in not identifying with that as. But identifying with the totality of what is and most particularly with that that the consciousness itself. That is really the root of what you are. And you are you are the consciousness that experience is this you are not the experience.

You're the whole consciousness. And although in the temporary condition that you manifest as right now. You may not be able to access the the totality of that consciousness that doesn't mean, but you cannot recognize yourself. As being apart that. So all of the problems that we deal with as a separate self and are exactly the same problems that we're confronted with when we look at a world made up of many separate themselves and entities. And so since the problems are the saying, the solutions are the same.

And the solutions are the the attainment of the kind of wisdom that goes going on are ordinary limited, what of sync things. This experience of what. Of self. Being beyond both existence and non existence. That's that's where that's where all answers are. And that's where, you know, You too can be simultaneously in this place of no separate cell and that one with everything. But at the same time, living the light of the entity that you are to the absolute pull us that's possible within the circumstances that you find yourself.

And that is really what it's all about. The buddha zed for eighty years, forty five of which were after he attained this realization. And that body and that mind functioned in the world has this best possible expression of that individual circumstance in spite of the fact that the mind of the buddha, throughout in their nevada. The body and speech. Have to do that functioned in the marketplace or in the world. But the mind is really don't and their data. And That's why. This is all about to get say that please.

I understand that the buddha died is food poisoning at haiti. And it is actually. Yeah. Yeah. Oh oh okay. And I wondered about that since there are yogis that are able to pass poison and through their systems without being affected and and do things like that. I would think Buddha just would cleaned up the food. There something. Well, Now this is even buddhist hand. Lives forever. And you might be very, very interested in reading the mah part Sutra, which is it's quite a lengthy sutra. It's probably well, it's San version is about that.

But his poly version is, you know, goes on for quite a few pages. You might be interested in reading it's it's it's wonderful. It's one of my favorite. But in in the sutra, He's eighty years old. And, you know, remember he's been sleeping on the ground under trees for fifty two of those years, you know. So and he actually makes the conscious decision to to leave the world. And this is this is quite a while before he actually goes and it served the needle by K the Smith, which is disbelief too. And again deposit his...

Yeah. He gave kind instructions that he was to be the only one to he dish and that everybody else was the other things and whatever he had left over supposed to be gary. You know, rather than anybody eating it. Mh. And so this would say suggest a he knew full well, the danger of the food thirty eight. And that there was a conscious decision that it was fine. Well, I mean, it's it's in the su he states it very clearly. And there's a description of him making the decision. About to that. But, you know, Yeah.

Remind mah she died cancelled when he was seventy. For example. We had find all kinds of, you know, there is a... I was looked about how how great games die that's long library here. Actually, you can't really i'd bring it that i'm checking. But I'll bring about really soon. But, you know, like what you could get many things from that but. One of things should go you look at it and say, see enlightened beings to die of all the same things that ordinary people does. Cancer, heart attacks, poisoning, you know, mean just Everything.

Oh all sorts of things. The the the point of spiritual realization is a you know, isn't that you're going to live forever or even particularly longer than anyone else. Mh. Also have been to India. Did pretty impressive that he could last eighty years there before getting serious food That's supernatural anyway. This this was a very good discussion I thought that wouldn't can be found to interesting. Dude started off with and carried through on I think what is it he's had important and and somewhat difficult point to to reconcile ourselves with, which is our our...

The potential for our own transcend of all suffering and the fact that at the same time, the world continues to be filled with suffering. Mh. Well it's eight forty two. So we probably let you let you go. And as I said earlier, we won't be doing the Thursday night next week, but we will delete after. And I hope you'll be able to come to the to the weekend teaching next three tenth. I. You know. And in a sense this was kind of a nice warm up too. You know what what is that like? I should take care And if you not able to come to the entire we weekend...

Can't come to friday nilly any part of it. Yes What about the the Friday meditation for next week? When the Friday morning meditation yeah. I I I... I'm not going to come in until Friday afternoon. So I guess that will be cancelled as well. Unless say somebody else would would you like to kinda leave it or you don't have time to stay for the whole thing? I can't do the thing. Yeah do the whole thing. Yeah. Well. Is anybody who is free would like to leave three since on friday morning. Okay. I should have asked earlier.

Right? Alright. So I think that's it for tonight. And so...

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